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1 year ago

Bringing Up a Special Needs Child in the Digital Age

There's a curious similarity to be had in the lack of eye contact, the effortless and steadfast obliviousness to conversation, and the touchy 'leave me alone' attitude held by both children absorbed in a video game and children who suffer from social disorders and mild autism-spectrum disorders. It's enough to make a clash of clans hacks no survey parent think that perhaps involvement in the digital world is exactly the wrong thing for a child with a social disorder... but that thought is wrong.
The fact is, digital media can be an excellent way for a child to explore what may otherwise be a strictly terrifying setting -- social interaction -- from a position of control, able to get away at any moment by turning the device off. Here are some of the many ways in which the digital age is solving problems for special needs parents:
Get Involved
This can seem a little paradoxical to many parents -- how do you 'get involved' when your child is clearly checked out, off in their own little digital world? The best way to do it is to figure out what they're doing when they're 'checked out,' and do it yourself. Learn what it means to have to mine far enough below the surface to start collecting clash of clans hacks diamonds, and how many you need to craft a diamond sword, and why it's important to have a diamond sword in the first place. 

Communicate Your Expectations

This is true on almost every level, in every activity. If your daughter has ADHD (and is, let's be frank, six years old in the first place) and wants to play a community-based online game like Clash of Clans or Hearthstone, you need to sit down and clash of clans cheats no survey talk to her about sportsmanship, about accepting losses along with victories, and about how to communicate with clanmates and enemies effectively and maturely. Don't assume that just because a game is digital, it's OK for your child to act less civilized than they would at soccer or Little League.

Similarly, communicate your expectations about the device usage in the first place. Some standard rules include "no iPad until after lunch/school," "no social media unless someone else is in the room with you," "no more than 45 consecutive clash of clans cheats minutes in front of a screen," and so on. Whatever your expectations are, communicate them clearly and express your disappointment if they aren't met.